Presidents’ Day

Presidents’ Day is a national holiday celebrated on the third Monday of February.

George Washingto
George Washington

Some think we are celebrating George Washington’s Birthday (February 22nd, 1732), some think we’re celebrating the combined birthdays of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln (February 12th, 1809), and some think it better to honor the memory of all presidents.

Take your pick.

It began in 1879 as a national holiday celebrating George Washington’s birthday, but at varying times it has been referred to as Presidents’ Day, President’s Day, and Washington’s and Lincoln’s Birthday.

Sometimes it seems that we can’t agree on much.

We think you will agree that George Washington would prefer we celebrate all US presidents. After all, he had the wisdom and foresight to retire gracefully, remarking in his Farewell Address that interwoven in our collective body “…is the love of liberty with every ligament of [our] hearts.”

Something we all agree on.

Traditionally, George Washington’s Birthday was celebrated with all things cherry: cherry pie, cherry cake, or just a huge bowl of cherries and cream. By tradition, since 1862 and the Civil War, the Senate reads George Washington’s Farewell Address to remind us that sacrifice and the love of liberty makes us Americans.

At Traditions Furniture in Downtown Overland Park and Wichita, we like to celebrate Presidents’ Day by offering 42% off your favorite piece of Stickley.

Presidents' Day
Presidents’ Day
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Author: traditionshome

Stickley Furniture and unique home furnishings in Overland Park and Wichita, .

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